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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Salt tolerance of field crops found in the catalog.

Salt tolerance of field crops

Leon Bernstein

Salt tolerance of field crops

by Leon Bernstein

  • 164 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soils -- Sodium content.,
  • Crops and soils.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[by Leon Bernstein].
    SeriesAgriculture information bulletin -- no. 217
    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22989941M

    veloped a salt tolerant cultivar, CSR10, in India (IRRI, ). However, the utilization of physiological char-acters in salt tolerance breeding in no way reduces the significance of agronomic characters in such a pro-gram. Instead, the methods for evaluating agronomic characters in salt tolerance . Table 3. Field crops — water salinity tolerance (ECw) This table indicates the yield reductions which could be expected when various field crops are irrigated with saline water and grown in moderate-to-slow draining soils. Field crop No reduction (dS/m) 10% reduction (dS/m) 25% reduction (dS/m) Barley Cotton (1)

      Soil salinity is one of the main environmental conditions that affects rice production. Identifying the genetic loci that affect rice salt tolerance (ST)-related traits at the seedling stage, especially under saline field conditions, is crucial for ST rice breeding by pyramiding ST genes that act at different developmental stages. Large phenotypic variations were observed in rice. 2. Course Title: Breeding of Field and Horticultural Crops 3. Credit Hours: 3 (2+1) 4. Breeding for abiotic stresses – breeding for salt tolerance response of plants to salinity – symptoms – mechanisms of salt tolerance – breeding methods for salt Panima Educational Book Agency, New Delhi. Kumar, N. .

    Salinity tolerance is influenced by many plant, soil, and environmental factors and their interrelationships. Generally, fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals are more salt sensitive than forage or field crops. In addition, certain varieties, cultivars, or rootstalks may tolerate higher salt levels than others. 18 food should be considered as models maize, wheat, rice, potatoes, and barley. If these major crops can be grown using saline resources, or if new, salt-tolerant crops that are acceptable substitutes can be developed, the worId's food supply will have a more diverse and vastly expanded base.


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Salt tolerance of field crops by Leon Bernstein Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Salt tolerance of field crops. [Leon Bernstein; United States. Agricultural Research Service. Soil and Water Conservation Research Division.] -- This bulletin explains how soil salinity affects field crops, provides information on the salt tolerance of field crops, and tells how to manage crops on saline soils.

Salt tolerance of agricultural crops (Literature review) the amount and quality of fresh water is actually decreasing and irrigation water and cropping fields are turning brackish or even saline.

This is why many researchers have studied the response of agricultural crops to different salt concentrations to determine their salinity. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Bernstein, Leon, Salt tolerance of fruit crops.

Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Crop salt tolerance is defined based on the crops ability to maintain yield and quality with increased salinity. The salt tolerance of crops can be described as a function of yiel d decline across a range of salt concentrations expressed as the average rootzone salinity (Figure 2).File Size: KB.

Definition of salt tolerance Plant salt tolerance or resistance is generally thought of in terms of the inherent ability of the plant to withstand the effects of high salts in the root zone or on the plant’s leaves without a significant adverse effect. Lunin et al. () proposed a couple of ground rules for salinity studies: (1) the actual tolerance of a given cropFile Size: KB.

Salinity tolerance in irrigated crops. June Primefact first edition Agriculture NSW Water Unit. Different crops can tolerate different levels of salinity in irrigation water. The tolerance of plants to salinity is mainly influenced by: climate, particularly the abundance or lack of rainfall to leach salts from soils soil types and drainage characteristics within the root zone which influence the ease of leaching and salt accumulation Other factors include rootstock or variety.

Horticultural Crops. The salt tolerance of a crop can be described as a complex function of yield decline across a range of salt concentrations (Maas and Hoffman ; Maas and Grattan ; van Genuchten and Hoffman ). Salt tol-erance can be adequately described on the basis of two parameters: threshold, the electrical conductivity (EC.

The maximum salt tolerance of wheat in Sampla is (say 5) dS/m before it starts to be affected negatively when the ECe increases more. This wheat crop is moderately sensitive to salt. The wheat data of Gohana show a higher salt tolerance (threshold salinity ECe=7dS/m) than the Sampla data.

The reason is unknown. The salt tolerance of a crop can best be described by plotting its relative yield as a continuous function of soil salinity. For most crops, this response function follows a sigmoidal relationship. However, some crops may die before the seed or fruit yields decrease to zero, thus eliminating the bottom part of the sigmoidal curve.

Salt tolerance is the relative ability of a plant to endure the effects of excess salts in the soil rooting medium in order to produce a satisfactory stand or yield.

The mode of tolerance can vary. Most plants avoid salinity, some evade or resist salinity, and a few actually tolerate salinity. Consequently, spring wheat, durum or winter wheat will not be suitable crops if the EC levels are mmhos/cm or more. The two most salt-tolerant annual crops are barley and oat.

Canadian research showed that both barley and oat yields started declining at EC levels of mmhos/cm or more (Fowler and Hamm, ).

Salt tolerance of crops is the maximum salt level a crop tolerates without losing its productivity while it is affected negatively at higher levels. The salt level is often taken as the soil salinity or the salinity of the irrigation water. Salt tolerance is of importance in irrigated lands in arid regions where the soil salinity problem can be extensive as a result of the salinization occurring here.

It concerns. Through this 2-volume book series, we critically assess the potential venues for imparting salt stress tolerance to major crops in the post-genomic era. Accordingly, perspectives on improving crop salinity tolerance by targeting the sensory, ion-transport and signaling mechanisms are presented here in volume 1.

Volume 2 will focus on the. HIGHLY SALT TOLERANT CROPS. Field Crops: Barley. Cotton. Mustard. Sugar beets. Fruits: Date palm. Coconut. Vegetables: Spinach. Kale. MEDIUM SALT TOLERANT CROPS.

Therefore, it is necessary to study the effect of these substances in salt tolerance of vegetable crops in field conditions. Humic substances can ameliorate the deleterious effects of salt stress by increasing root growth, altering mineral uptake, and decreasing membrane damage, thus inducing salt tolerance [ 59 ].

salt-tolerant. crops. Michael C. Shannon Calvin 0. Qualset. ome crops, such as cotton, bar. ley, safflower, or sugarbeet, can. be grown in relatively saline. soils; others, including beans and corn, can be grown only in nonsaline soils. In general, crops tolerate salinity up to a threshold level above which yields decrease approximately linearly as salt concentrations increase.

Our best estimate of the threshold salinity level and yield decrease per unit salinity increase is presented for a large number of agricultural crops. Quantifying yields in saline soils, and using proper controls in field trials, can guide crop improvement programs. Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture.

To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance.

In this book chapter, we will review the latest information about the ‘Salinity Stress in Arid and Semi-Arid Climates: Effects and Management in Field Crops, which could be a good advantage to the scientific community and farmers for the understanding of salinity issue in.

“The most salt-tolerant crops are barley, camelina, rye, safflower, sunflower, and sugar beets,” says Aberle. “We’ve replaced a lot of these crops with the least-tolerant crops, which are dry beans, soybeans, corn, and field peas.” 2. Grow cover crops that are salt tolerant. There is an urgent need to identify and transfer such important genes into well-established cultivars, which is cost effective, safe for human health, and environmental friendly.

Therefore, current study provides a greater overview of physiological mechanism and molecular approaches involved in salt tolerance mechanism of fruit crops. Na + exclusion from leaves is associated with salt tolerance in cereal crops including rice, durum wheat, bread wheat and barley (Richard A.

James, Blake, Byrt, & Munns, ). Exclusion of Na + from the leaves is due to low net Na + uptake by cells in the root cortex and the tight control of net loading of the xylem by parenchyma cells in the. 4. Choose salt-tolerant crops. In the zone radiating out from the bull’s-eye (where the soil EC tests more than 2), plant salt-tolerant cash crops such as barley, sunflowers, or canola.

“Corn and soybeans are poor choices because they’re not salt-tolerant,” says Augustin.